" Children of the Stars "

6 hours ago with 595 notes, via the-electric-boogaloo, from asapscience
asapscience:


Excellent advice from (arguably) the coolest physicist to have ever lived, Richard Feynman: you don’t have to be a genius to want to study science, you just have to work hard!
Edit: just realized the initial quote reads: “ordinary” rather than “normal” — our apologies for the screw up! 
Photo via Vice, quote via whats-out-there

asapscience:

Excellent advice from (arguably) the coolest physicist to have ever lived, Richard Feynman: you don’t have to be a genius to want to study science, you just have to work hard!

Edit: just realized the initial quote reads: “ordinary” rather than “normal” — our apologies for the screw up! 

Photo via Vice, quote via whats-out-there



5 days ago with 7 notes
Trying to identify my newest hand picked specimen from California. Perhaps a day flying moth?

Trying to identify my newest hand picked specimen from California. Perhaps a day flying moth?



5 days ago with 23 notes
tuggywuggy: this water can conduct electricity???? government must be putting florine in it!!!!!!!

DID YOU KNOW THAT SALT IS CALLED SODIUM CHLORIDE AND CHLORINE IS SUPER DANGEROUS?!!!! DON’T EAT SALT IT’S A CHEMICAL IT WILL KILL YOU.



5 days ago with 32,032 notes, via tuggywuggy, from dabaryah-deactivated20130614
t-hein:

blondeclarinet:

supermattural:

kingdizzy88:

dabaryah:

I tested Walmart’s brand of bottled water and I was shocked to see they sell the most toxic water ever. I tested for Total Dissolved Solids using a TDS meter and the number I got was 271. THAT IS THE MOST TOXIC WATER I HAVE EVER SEEN. Even NYC tap water TDS score is 39. Poland Spring is 42. The water is not even drinkable. I think it’s Criminal to even make profits from selling this water filled with sodium fluoride and who knows what else is in that. 500 ppm (parts per million) is the EPA Maximum but even though the FDA is corrupt their recommended is 000, which is pure. THE ONLY BOTTLED WATER THAT READS 000 IS DUANEreade/Walgreens ‘NICE’ branded water. PLEASE SHARE THIS INFO ALONG.


- anonymous


Damn wally mart… Damn… :/

ok wow i could of told you that shit was toxic without using science 

not freaking great value.

science side of tumblr here!
it could just mean that whatever is in the water is very conductive, or the ions are unbalanced.  A TDS meter actually measures the conductance of the water (source here), so the high reading could just mean that the water is slightly acidic, or slightly basic, or has some chlorine in it (hopefully not, but you get the picture).
Furthermore JUST BECAUSE THERE IS STUFF IN THE WATER DOESN’T MEAN IT’S BAD FOR YOU. Mineral water (both the carbonated European-style stuff and the colourful yuppie stuff) and sports drinks are sold BECAUSE they have stuff dissolved in them.  Try using the TDS meter on Gatorade, and it should go off the charts because Gatorade is marketed as full of electrolytes!
By law, anything consumable sold has to have its content listed (at least in Canada, maybe not in the states), so you should see something on the side like the nutrition information called “mineral content.”
I’m not arguing that Wal-Mart water is good for you, or even good at all, it just pisses me off to see people using devices that give a numerical answer, and passing that number around as proof of anything if they don’t understand what the number represents.

Welcome to tumblr, where everything is exaggerated and the science doesn’t matter

t-hein:

blondeclarinet:

supermattural:

kingdizzy88:

dabaryah:

I tested Walmart’s brand of bottled water and I was shocked to see they sell the most toxic water ever. I tested for Total Dissolved Solids using a TDS meter and the number I got was 271. THAT IS THE MOST TOXIC WATER I HAVE EVER SEEN. Even NYC tap water TDS score is 39. Poland Spring is 42. The water is not even drinkable. I think it’s Criminal to even make profits from selling this water filled with sodium fluoride and who knows what else is in that. 500 ppm (parts per million) is the EPA Maximum but even though the FDA is corrupt their recommended is 000, which is pure.

THE ONLY BOTTLED WATER THAT READS 000 IS DUANEreade/Walgreens ‘NICE’ branded water.


PLEASE SHARE THIS INFO ALONG.

- anonymous

Damn wally mart… Damn… :/

ok wow i could of told you that shit was toxic without using science 

not freaking great value.

science side of tumblr here!

it could just mean that whatever is in the water is very conductive, or the ions are unbalanced.  A TDS meter actually measures the conductance of the water (source here), so the high reading could just mean that the water is slightly acidic, or slightly basic, or has some chlorine in it (hopefully not, but you get the picture).

Furthermore JUST BECAUSE THERE IS STUFF IN THE WATER DOESN’T MEAN IT’S BAD FOR YOU. Mineral water (both the carbonated European-style stuff and the colourful yuppie stuff) and sports drinks are sold BECAUSE they have stuff dissolved in them.  Try using the TDS meter on Gatorade, and it should go off the charts because Gatorade is marketed as full of electrolytes!

By law, anything consumable sold has to have its content listed (at least in Canada, maybe not in the states), so you should see something on the side like the nutrition information called “mineral content.”

I’m not arguing that Wal-Mart water is good for you, or even good at all, it just pisses me off to see people using devices that give a numerical answer, and passing that number around as proof of anything if they don’t understand what the number represents.

Welcome to tumblr, where everything is exaggerated and the science doesn’t matter



6 days ago with 1,340 notes, via tuggywuggy, from mathprofessorquotes
Using the chain rule is like peeling an onion. You have to deal with every layer at a time and if it’s too big you’ll start crying.
Calculus professor (via mathprofessorquotes)


1 week ago with 2 notes
iluvmyweinerdog: "Easiest physics" sounds like an oxymoron. In any case, what would be considered the "hardest physics"? (Woo astrophysics!)

I suppose anything in modern physics constitutes as “hardest”. QM is no walk in the park, and I expect nuclear physics is quite rigorous as well.

If you’re asking me personally classical mechanics is the hardest. I never do well in mechanics for some reason



1 week ago with 149 notes, via wuzzymolecules, from shychemist
oxidoreductase: I've had male friends in engineering/computing sciences tell me tell me that I went into biology because it's the "softest" science and that I couldn't do what they do.

shychemist:

Ugh.

Its sad that this kind of attitude is still so prevalent. The concept of a field of science as more manly or that could be only done by a man needs to be destroyed. Gender roles make me upset. :(

I try my best not to think like this, but I’ll admit this mindset slips through once in a while. I try not to think like this because it happens in almost every STEM field.

I’ve even considered switching to pure physics instead of going for an astrophysics undergrad degree because I’ve had male colleagues tell me astro is popular among women for being the easiest physics. Screw that.

I just ignore that mindset and remember that “easiness” is subjective, and while there are “hard” and “soft” sciences and even though I’m considered to be in a “hard” science I can’t for the life of me remember biological concepts.



1 week ago with 2,006 notes, via electricspacekoolaid, from electricspacekoolaid

electricspacekoolaid:

Ancient Egyptians Used Meteorites For Jewelry

Open University (OU) and University of Manchester researchers wrote in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science that they found proof that ancient Egyptians used meteorites to make accessories.

In 1911, archaeologists dug up strings of iron beads at the Gerzeh cemetery, about 43 miles south of Cairo. The Gerzeh bead is the earliest discovered use of iron by the Egyptians, dating back from 3350 to 3600 BC. The bead was originally thought to be from a meteorite based on its composition of nickel-rich iron, but scientists challenged this theory back in the 1980s. However, the latest research places this theory back on top.

The scientists used a combination of electron microscope and X-ray CT scanner analyses to demonstrate that the nickel-rich chemical composition of the bead confirms its meteorite origins.

Philip Withers, a professor of materials science at University of Manchester, said meteorites have a unique microstructural and chemical fingerprint because they cooled incredibly slowly as they traveled through space. He said it was interesting to find that fingerprint in the Gerzeh bead.

“This research highlights the application of modern technology to ancient materials not only to understand meteorites better but also to help us understand what ancient cultures considered these materials to be and the importance they placed upon them,” said Open University Project Officer Diane Johnson, who led the study.

 -Read More -



1 week ago with 1,304 notes, via purple-cosmos, from spaceplasma

spaceplasma:

Dark Gamma Ray Bursts

An artist’s conception of the environment around GRB 020819B based on ALMA observations. The GRB occurred in an arm of a galaxy in the constellation of Pisces (The Fishes). GRBs are huge explosions of a star spouting high-speed jets in a direction toward the observer. In a complete surprise, less gas was observed than expected, and correspondingly much more dust, making some GRBs appear as “dark GRBs”.

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are intense bursts of extremely high energy observed in distant galaxies — the brightest explosive phenomenon in the Universe. Bursts that last more than a couple of seconds are known as long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) and are associated with supernova explosions — powerful detonations at the ends of the lives of massive stars.

In just a matter of seconds, a typical burst releases as much energy as the Sun will in its entire ten-billion-year lifetime. The explosion itself is often followed by a slowly fading emission, known as an afterglow, which is thought to be created by collisions between the ejected material and the surrounding gas. However, some gamma-ray bursts mysteriously seem to have no afterglow — they are referred to as dark bursts. One possible explanation is that clouds of dust absorb the afterglow radiation.

  • More information: here

Credit: Bunyo Hatsukade(NAOJ), ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)



1 week ago with 54 notes, via thenewenlightenmentage, from thenewenlightenmentage
thenewenlightenmentage:

Could T. Rex Really Only See You If You Moved?
“Don’t move! He can’t see us if we don’t move.” An iconic scene in an iconic movie- Dr. Alan Grant saves the pair from being a T-Rex’s next meal by staying frozen still since, apparently, their vision is based on movement (let’s just forget about the fact that the dino would definitely have been able to smell them). We know it’s a film, but is there actually any truth to this? Let’s find out.
University of Oregon researcher Professor Kent Stevens began a project called “DinoMorph” in 1993 (the same year as Jurassic Park was released, funnily enough) which set out to generate digital models of various theropod dinosaurs, including the infamous Tyrannosaurus rex and Velociraptors (which, by the way, were actually much smaller than the film depicted, and had feathers). Theropods were bipedal, flesh-eating dinosaurs with short forelimbs. 
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Could T. Rex Really Only See You If You Moved?

“Don’t move! He can’t see us if we don’t move.” An iconic scene in an iconic movie- Dr. Alan Grant saves the pair from being a T-Rex’s next meal by staying frozen still since, apparently, their vision is based on movement (let’s just forget about the fact that the dino would definitely have been able to smell them). We know it’s a film, but is there actually any truth to this? Let’s find out.

University of Oregon researcher Professor Kent Stevens began a project called “DinoMorph” in 1993 (the same year as Jurassic Park was released, funnily enough) which set out to generate digital models of various theropod dinosaurs, including the infamous Tyrannosaurus rex and Velociraptors (which, by the way, were actually much smaller than the film depicted, and had feathers). Theropods were bipedal, flesh-eating dinosaurs with short forelimbs. 

Continue Reading