" Children of the Stars "

1 year ago with 13 notes

Happy Native American Heritage month - Day 30!

We’re done! We did it! I’ve done 30 consecutive posts about my culture and my tribe. I originally planned to record myself telling one of my favorite stories in Kumeyaay, but those plans had to be cut. So I thought I’d introduce myself, not as “Lindsay” but in the one alias I truly identify as. I also originally had a long post, but it was deleted after tumblr froze on me, please bare with me as I lazily give you a quick paragraph.

___

Howka! Na’apa nihi Ho’ak Halyaxai. Mah’th wam sha’hauk sarap ama’ayhk cha’pap wih’ith. Na’apa ny’tell Suzanne wi’ich xi. Na’apa ni’kyu Inya wi’ich xi. Na’apa a’sull A’sin Kat’kurlhk, a’ Ho’mak Hatapa. Neh’kweth we’ump te’wa Campo, a’ kwa’haup San Jose de La Zorra. Inyage ka’mah, inyage mikape, inyage neh’kweth Kumeyaay. Na’aj pey’yii haut en’yow aukur.

___

Hi! My name is Ho’ak Halyaxai (first new moon). I am 19 years old. My mom’s name is Suzanne, my dad’s name is Inya (sun). My brother’s names are A’sin Namul (second wolf), and Ho’mak Hatapa (third coyote).  I am from the Campo reservation, but my family comes from San Jose de La Zorra. I dance, speak,and live my life in Kumeyaay. We are here, forever.

___

It’s important for me to share my story because no one knows I live two lives. In public I am a normal U.S. citizen. No one knows that English is my second language, or that I still traditionally practice my culture; no one knows that I am 1 of an estimated 500 people who speaks my language. 

No one knows I was born on a reservation where living conditions were similar to third world countries, or that I am actively trying to preserve my language and culture.

I live in a country where my culture, after over 500 years, is still seen as “savage” and “primitive”. My culture is everything but savage. It is beautiful, it is unique, and it is endangered. I advise the U.S. to stop ignoring its original inhabitants, to stop ignoring our societal problems. I advise the U.S. to fix its history education. We are still here even after over 500 years of assimilation and genocide.

We are still here, and we shall forever remain.

___

You can find every NAHM post here, every NAHM question here, and a list of books on Native history here.

Thank you again for your support, your questions, and your interest. 



1 year ago with 7 notes

Happy Native American Heritage month - Day 29!

Wow. We’re nearly done! I can’t believe I’ve done 29 consecutive posts about my culture. Honestly, I couldn’t have done it without you guys and your support. Your messages (published and privately answered) have been amazing, and I thank everyone who has been interested with the posts. Let’s hope my last post will be a fantastic ending to this equally fantastic journey.

Today I thought I’d show something that is special to the Southern California tribes, and to me personally. Although our creation stories are different from each other’s we have one main element that is the same: birds. 

In each of our respective creation story, Creator sent us a bird to give us songs that would let us tell our stories and act as a moral guide. Many of our stories first state that Creator sent us a black bird who was stingy and did not give up the songs so a humble, yet beautiful hummingbird was sent to give us our songs.

To this day, bird singing is still a traditional element of Southern California tribes. The SoCal bird singing heard today is usually sung in Cahuilla, but there are other tribes that have their own songs in their own languages.

These are social songs, so anyone who knows the words is allowed to sing. Another social aspect of the songs is the dancing. Generally the men will sing the songs while sitting or standing, but may also leave the group to dance in front of the women. The women will stand in front of the men and dance in a half-circular shape doing quick hops with their hands place out. 

Sometimes the women may honor a man who is singing by dancing up to him. This could be a sign of appreciating his singing ability or as a sign of courtship. 

The songs are mostly kept under 5 minutes, but the length and lyrics is up to the singers. Traditionally they were sung in cycles for many hours, repeating the same lyrics over and over.  

Bird singing is complicated though. Each singer must make his own rattle by picking seasoned gourds and preparing them carefully so that when filled, will make a good rattling sound. The singing also takes practice, so often times the men singers will have young boys beside them trying to get a feel for the singing. 

Not only is bird singing beautiful to listen to, it is a tool for us to keep our languages and stories alive so that younger generations will not be outcast from their culture like their ancestors were forced to abandon it.

We’re still here, and we shall forever remain through our songs.



1 year ago with 1 note

Happy Native American Heritage month - Day 28!

One of the amazing things about my culture in general are the ceremonies we sometimes go through. Some of us do not go through them for various reasons, but there are still many of us who are fortunate enough to have the chance.

The best ceremonies are always the coming of age ones. All tribes will have some sort of ceremony celebrating a boy’s or girl’s emergence into adulthood. The most popularly known is the Apache Sunrise Dance. 

The Sunrise Dance is a ceremony for a girl’s entrance into womanhood.

Like most American Indian religious ceremonies, the Sunrise Dance is based on tribal folklore. According to legend, White Shell Woman, who is alternatively called White Painted Woman and Changing Woman, survives a flood by floating in an abalone shell. She establishes the puberty rite to teach the rites of womanhood. When she is old, White Shell Woman walks east to the sun and meets her younger self and, merging with it, becomes young again. Symbolically, each Apache woman meets her younger self when her daughter performs the dances, and is born again and again, generation to generation.

 The ceremony has earned a somewhat mystical reputation. In the early 1900s, when the U.S. government was still trying to Americanize Indians, tribal rituals such as the Sunrise Dance were banned. Despite the ban, Apaches continued to conduct the ceremony in secret. In 1978, the American Indian Religious Freedom Act was passed, and the tribe could once again have the dance without retribution.

 The ceremony lasts for many days, and depends on the girl’s stamina to dance for continuous hours. She will dance with family, and with the crown dancers.

The dancers are called Ga’an, or Mountain Spirits. They also are called crown dancers, a name given to them by White traders because of their colorful, towering headpieces. The dancers play a sacred part of the Sunrise Dance by bringing blessings and removing negative spirits, Apache cultural experts say. Bells and tin sewn to their kilts represent the sound of raindrops as they hit the earth.

 Of the five dancers, one is a clown whose face is painted white with black markings. During the dance, he is a servant and messenger for the Ga’an, who are also painted white, the symbol of purity, with black markings.

The clown carries a bull roarer, a piece of wood on the end of a leather string that emits a dying engine sound, but represents the sound of wind in an oncoming storm. He twirls the bull roarer to signal the start of the day’s activities.

After days of dancing the ceremony is ended with the Ga’an blessing the girl with a corn mixture. Then her family and/or godparents will do the same until she becomes the “White Painted Woman”. Completing one more dance as the White Painted Woman the paint will be thrown on the crowd, and anyone who is touched by the paint will be blessed. 

________

People don’t usually think of the stamina girls and boys have to endure during their puberty rituals. They are in their early teens when they go through the ceremonies and have to be able to dance for hours and days. Not all tribe’s puberty ceremonies include non-stop dancing, though, and are very different than others. 

My tribe’s girl’s ceremony is called “atanuk” and does include continuous dancing, but not exclusively of the girl. The girl (or girls) being honored are laid in a pit of hot rocks and herbs while older girls and women dance around. We must remain as motionless and as long as possible. During the ceremony we cannot eat meat we can only drink water (but only if we must).

After many days of song and dance cycles we are given our tattoos; vertical chin tattoos and possibly even a small have moon shape on our cheek; sometimes chest tattoos may be done as well. The tattooing concludes the ceremony and symbolizes our powerful role as a woman in our society.

Read more about the Apache Sunrise Dance here



1 year ago with 6 notes

Happy Native American Heritage month - Day 27!

Population 

5.1 million
As of the 2011 American Community Survey, the nation’s population of American Indians and Alaska Natives, including those of more than one race. They made up 1.6 percent of the total population. Of this total, about half were American Indian and Alaska Native only, and about half were American Indian and Alaska Native in combination with one or more other races.
 Source: 2011 American Community Survey

8.6 million
The projected population of American Indians and Alaska Natives, including those of more than one race, on July 1, 2050. They would comprise 2 percent of the total population.
Source: Population projections

1.1 million

Increase in the nation’s American Indian and Alaska Native population between the 2000 Census and 2010 Census. The population of this group increased by 26.7 percent during this period compared with the overall population growth of 9.7 percent.
Source: Census 2000 Brief: Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin
 
689,320
The American Indian and Alaska Native population in California as of the 2011 American Community Survey. California was followed by Oklahoma (502,934) and Arizona (346,380). 
Source: 2011 American Community Survey

14

Number of states with more than 100,000 American Indian and Alaska Native residents as of the 2011 American Community Survey. These states were California, Oklahoma, Arizona, Texas, New Mexico, Washington, North Carolina, New York, Florida, Michigan, Alaska, Colorado, Oregon and Minnesota.
 Source: 2011 American Community Survey


19.7%

The proportion of Alaska’s population identified as American Indian and Alaska Native as of the 2011 American Community Survey, the highest rate for this race group of any state. Alaska was followed by Oklahoma (13.3 percent), South Dakota (10.4 percent), and New Mexico (10.4 percent). 
 Source: 2011 American Community Survey 

31.3

Median age for those who are American Indian and Alaska Native, and no other race. This compares with a median age of 37.3 for the U.S. population as a whole.
 Source: 2011 American Community Survey 

Reservations

324

Number of federally recognized American Indian reservations in 2010. All in all, excluding Hawaiian Home Lands, there are 617 American Indian and Alaska Native legal and statistical areas for which the Census Bureau provides statistics.
  Source: Census Bureau Geography Division

22%

Percentage of American Indians and Alaska Natives, alone or in combination, who lived in American Indian areas or Alaska Native Village Statistical Areas in 2010. These American Indian areas include federal American Indian reservations and/or off-reservation trust lands, Oklahoma tribal statistical areas, tribal designated statistical areas, state American Indian reservations, and state designated American Indian statistical areas.
 Source: 2010 Census Summary File 1 

Tribes

566

Number of federally recognized Indian tribes.
Source: Bureau of Indian Affairs

100,000+

In the 2010 Census, the tribal groupings with 100,000 or more responses for the American Indian and Alaska Native alone-or-in-any combination population were Cherokee (819,105), Navajo (332,129), Choctaw (195,764), Mexican American Indian (175,494), Chippewa (170,742), Sioux (170,110), Apache (111,810) and Blackfeet (105,304).
 Source: 2010 Census Summary File 1, Table PCT3

Education

78.9%

Among American Indians and Alaska Natives alone 25 and older who have a bachelor’s degree or higher, the percentage whose bachelor’s degree is in science and engineering, or science and engineering- related fields in 2011. This compares with 44 percent for all people 25 and older with this level of education.
 Source: 2011 American Community Survey

65,356
 
Number of American Indians and Alaska Natives alone 25 and older who had a graduate or professional degree in 2011.
 Source: 2011 American Community Survey

Income and Poverty

$35,192

The median income of American Indian and Alaska Native alone households in 2011. This compares with $50,502 for the nation as a whole.
 Source: 2011 American Community Survey

_____ 

Native American statistics produce shocking numbers. We have high percentages of domestic violence, poor education, fetal alcohol syndrome, suicide and drug overdose, and poverty. We aren’t all rich people making huge profits off of reservation-run casinos. Many of us come from reservation conditions similar to third world countries, and a majority of us will never pursue a life outside of the reservation.

Educate yourself with not only our history, but the modern-day effects of it. We are still here and we are still underrepresented in politics. Help us fight.


Read the entire list of statistics here

Image Credit: United States Census Bureau



1 year ago with 6 notes
Happy Native American Heritage month - Day 26!
Guess what? Racism against Native Americans still exists. To others we will always be “savages” or “squaws”; we will always be the group of people who were pushed off their lands; we will always be “dead”. So that gives others the permission to continually be ignorant towards us.
___
“What happened after Chief Short Cake Died?” That was the question posed at the top of 17-year-old Noah Archer’s assignment on Friday, September 28. The answer to which was, “Squaw Bury Short Cake.”His mother, Abbey Thompson, snapped a photo of her son’s completed assignment with her cell phone and uploaded it onto her Facebook page on Sunday, September 30 and it’s drawn quite a response.Thompson, a member of the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa in Wisconsin, said she’s received messages from people all over the United States and Canada.
“As a white person, I am pissed my tax dollars are being spent to belittle and oppress Native students,” Mary Sharlow says on Facebook. “I am pissed my tax dollars are being spent to promote white privilege. I am pissed LUHS continues to teach racism.”Thompson was “at a loss for words” when she posted the picture and said she “thought Lakeland Union High School was making progress in the area of race relations until I saw this.”
Richard A. Vesbach, the math teacher who assigned the homework and is in his third year of teaching at LUHS, has written a number of letters apologizing.

“It is with deepest regret and intense humility,” he begins one of the letters, dated October 1 and addressed to Joni Theobald, the Lac du Flambeau Tribe’s education director.

In the letter he explains that the assignment was in an outdated book of worksheets from the 1980s he found in the room when he first started teaching. He also says he has discarded the book.

“None of that excuses what has happened and I take full responsibility for my actions,” Vesbach continues. “No one else is to blame but me. As a result, LUHS has appropriately sent me home for the day. I recommended that they not pay me.”

Theobald’s letter also addresses the need for a five-year professional development plan at LUHS that includes tribal culture and content across curriculums.Thompson also hopes this incident brings more cultural sensitivity to the LUHS school curriculum.

“Even if this was an oversight by one teacher, it reveals a problem that has plagued the Wisconsin Northwoods community for decades, and it ranks right up there with the mascot issue, the stereotyping of Native Americans,” she told ICTMN. “With Columbus Day approaching again, this would be an excellent topic of discussion for everyone. What word does your average American use in their daily vocabulary—Indian giver, for instance, or in this case ‘squaw’—without thinking that would offend us? How do they think WE feel when we see people dressed in an Indian costume for Halloween? This kind of thinking and oversight needs to be corrected. Public institutions such as our schools must take that first step.”

So yes, when people still use “Redskins” as a mascot we find that racist. When non-Natives wear our sacred regalia (yeah I’m talking about warbonnets) we find that racist; you are “playing Indian”. This is cultural and historical ignorance at its finest. Educate yourselves about the original inhabitants of your country.
We are still here, and we aren’t going to sit idly by while people continue to be ignorant and racist.


Read article here

Happy Native American Heritage month - Day 26!

Guess what? Racism against Native Americans still exists. To others we will always be “savages” or “squaws”; we will always be the group of people who were pushed off their lands; we will always be “dead”. So that gives others the permission to continually be ignorant towards us.

___

“What happened after Chief Short Cake Died?” That was the question posed at the top of 17-year-old Noah Archer’s assignment on Friday, September 28. The answer to which was, “Squaw Bury Short Cake.”

His mother, Abbey Thompson, snapped a photo of her son’s completed assignment with her cell phone and uploaded it onto her Facebook page on Sunday, September 30 and it’s drawn quite a response.

Thompson, a member of the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa in Wisconsin, said she’s received messages from people all over the United States and Canada.

“As a white person, I am pissed my tax dollars are being spent to belittle and oppress Native students,” Mary Sharlow says on Facebook. “I am pissed my tax dollars are being spent to promote white privilege. I am pissed LUHS continues to teach racism.”

Thompson was “at a loss for words” when she posted the picture and said she “thought Lakeland Union High School was making progress in the area of race relations until I saw this.”

Richard A. Vesbach, the math teacher who assigned the homework and is in his third year of teaching at LUHS, has written a number of letters apologizing.

“It is with deepest regret and intense humility,” he begins one of the letters, dated October 1 and addressed to Joni Theobald, the Lac du Flambeau Tribe’s education director.

In the letter he explains that the assignment was in an outdated book of worksheets from the 1980s he found in the room when he first started teaching. He also says he has discarded the book.

“None of that excuses what has happened and I take full responsibility for my actions,” Vesbach continues. “No one else is to blame but me. As a result, LUHS has appropriately sent me home for the day. I recommended that they not pay me.”

Theobald’s letter also addresses the need for a five-year professional development plan at LUHS that includes tribal culture and content across curriculums.

Thompson also hopes this incident brings more cultural sensitivity to the LUHS school curriculum.

“Even if this was an oversight by one teacher, it reveals a problem that has plagued the Wisconsin Northwoods community for decades, and it ranks right up there with the mascot issue, the stereotyping of Native Americans,” she told ICTMN.

“With Columbus Day approaching again, this would be an excellent topic of discussion for everyone. What word does your average American use in their daily vocabulary—Indian giver, for instance, or in this case ‘squaw’—without thinking that would offend us? How do they think WE feel when we see people dressed in an Indian costume for Halloween? This kind of thinking and oversight needs to be corrected. Public institutions such as our schools must take that first step.”

So yes, when people still use “Redskins” as a mascot we find that racist. When non-Natives wear our sacred regalia (yeah I’m talking about warbonnets) we find that racist; you are “playing Indian”. This is cultural and historical ignorance at its finest. Educate yourselves about the original inhabitants of your country.

We are still here, and we aren’t going to sit idly by while people continue to be ignorant and racist.

Read article here



1 year ago with 13 notes

Happy Native American Heritage month - Day 25!

I’ve said it before many times that in U.S. schools Native Americans are given a chapter (at best) in textbooks. The topics mentioned are usually chiefs, General Custer, and the Trail of Tears. There is no mention of the boarding schools, the broken treaties, the bounty hunting, or one of the most significant events in Native American history; the Wounded Knee Massacre.

The Lakota/Sioux have always encountered problems with the government, but the harshest during the mid 1800’s.

In the 1870’s the Black Hills (a very important site to the Sioux) gathered attention by settlers for its soil. Due to settlers encroaching on sacred land revolts led by Tatanka Iyotake (Sitting Bull) and Tashunca-uitco (Crazy Horse).

After the 1876 Native defeat of General Custer at Little Big Horn, General Nelson Miles stepped in to pave a path to victory including suing the Natives and having them sign a treaty that gave up their rights to the Black Hills. The Natives were then pushed off the land and onto reservations, some fleeing to Canada or nearby states. 

In 1890 a Nevada Paiute Native, Wovoka brought to the Lakota’s a spiritual movement called the Ghost Dance. It caused hope to spread through the communities, including passionate dancing. Because the settlers feared oncoming Lakota revolts as a result of seeing them dance wildly an army was sent to subdue the Natives.

The army tried to subdue Sitting Bull, but killed him during the arrest. Some Natives were afraid of more aggression from the army and decided to flee to Pine Ridge, but were intercepted by General Miles and moved to Wounded Knee Creek. 

Shortly after General Miles and his army demanded the Ghost Dancers to surrender any weapons they had. The Ghost Dancers reluctantly gave up their weapons in fear of being attacked by the army. While surrendering a gun went off and the army opened fire on the Natives. Some of the men fought back, but were quickly shot down by the army as well as any one who tried running away. 

Of the some 100 Native men, women, and children in the camp all were either shot dead or later died from the winter. 

Although this was the last major confrontation of the Natives in the Great Plains, there is still struggle in the Black Hills, as Pe’Sla is being auctioned off.

Pe’Sla is a part of the Lakota Creation story and is once again being taken away from them.

We are still here, people. We are still here, and no matter how hard the government tries to keep us ignored in politics and in textbooks we are still here and we shall forever remain.



1 year ago with 153 notes

Happy Native American Heritage month - Day 24!

You all knew it was coming, and I honestly don’t know why I put it off until now.

My culture is not a costume.

My culture is not to be sexualized.

"I’m only showing my respect to Natives and their beautiful culture", "I’m actually part Native", "You can’t tell me what to wear". 

We hear it all the time, and one of the biggest complaints we receive is “It’s because I’m white, isn’t it?”

No, it’s not because you’re white and we’re upset your ancestors may or may not have scalped a couple of our ancestors. It’s because you’re non-Native; it’s because you don’t know our history (acknowledging our history was sad and tragic doesn’t count); it’s because you don’t know the difference between respect and ignorance; it’s because the warbonnet was not made for you to wear.

I don’t know what it is with the ladies, but they are 9/10 the ones who love to buy and wear warbonnets. Why? Why do you gals like to wear them? 

Warbonnets were worn by men; chiefs and warriors. There were some female warriors and chiefs, sure, but they did not put on warbonnets. 

They were not bought for showing off in pictures and to look cool, they were earned. Each feather on a man’s warbonnet was earned. (Fun fact: Natives are the only people in the U.S. that have the granted ability to possess Eagle feathers) Even today Eagle feathers are sometimes given out to Natives who have done something to earn them.

Also, ladies, why are you sexualizing our culture? Go look up news articles about the societal issues on our reservations. High numbers of our women suffer from domestic violence, sexual assault, and kidnapping. Do you honestly think we enjoy seeing our sacred ceremonial regalia paraded down a catwalk with an itty bikini beneath it?  

Historically only a handful of Natives in the Great Plains wore warbonnets. The mainstreaming of the piece was due to Hollywood and tourism, when everyone suddenly became fascinated with the “dying people”. Natives outside of the groups who originally wore warbonnets began to wear them as well in hopes of getting some income. That small group of Great Plains Natives who traditionally wore warbonnets grew into the entire U.S. Native population wearing them. Not all Natives wore warbonnets, stop contributing to the distortion of our culture.

To say you’re part “what-have-you” gives you the permission to wear a warbonnet is ignorant in itself. Not even all full-blooded Natives are allowed to wear them. My father, a full-blooded California Indian, born and raised on a reservation is not allowed to wear a warbonnet. Natives across the country aren’t, so why are you?  

To say you’re being respectful towards our “beautiful culture” while wearing a warbonnet is an insult. That is not respect. Respect is supporting our artists, educating yourself with our history (not with the stories you’re told in Elementary school), helping us survive and fight our societal problems.

Most of the people who put on warbonnets for show do not know what our ancestor’s truly lived through and what we still live through today. Most of us live below poverty level, our reservations are akin to third world conditions, and many of us are victims of abuse, racism, and drug addiction But it’s much easier for someone to put on a warbonnet and instantly transform themselves into the heroic savage under the guise of respect, is it not? 

I’m not here to tell you what you can and cannot wear, but be mindful that what you put on may not culturally and historically belong to you. Be respectful and educate yourself. 

We are still here.



1 year ago with 4 notes

Happy Native American Heritage month - Day 23!

I’m still baking…I’ve got about 3 more pounds of acorn and a huge box of acorn recipes. 

Today I made acorn spice bread and acorn spice cookies. They’re both my favorites, and are fantastic ideas for gift giving. Enjoy!

Acorn Spice Cookies 

 Ingredients

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 325°.
  2. In a large bowl mix butter and white sugar together. When fully incorporated, add brown sugar and cream together. 
  3. Mix in honey and a beaten egg.
  4. In a separate bowl mix flours, cinnamon, allspice, ginger, nutmeg, baking soda, and salt together. 
  5. Fold the dry ingredients into the wet and mix until combined. Do not overmix; combination should not be runny - if runny, add more flour by 1 tablespoon until consistency is like smooth oatmeal.
  6. Drop spoonfuls of batter onto a cookie sheet, pressing them down in small cakes.
  7. Bake for 5-10 minutes, keeping watch on them to make sure they don’t burn. Remember: acorn flour burns easily.

Acorn Spice Bread

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375°. 
  2. In a large bowl, combine flours, sugar(s), ground cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, and baking powder. 
  3. In a separate bowl whisk the eggs, and add the milk and oil.
  4. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredient bowl and pour the wet mixture in. Mix until combined. Do not overmix. 
  5. Pour batter into a 9x5 pan and bake for 30-50 minutes, or until knife is clean. Keep an eye on the loafs, the acorn flour will burn it quickly.

There are so many uses for acorn meal. I encourage everyone who loves to bake to find a bag of acorn flour and bake away.

A childhood favorite of mine were acorn tortillas, fried over a fire and spread with butter. Certainly not the healthiest, but was always an amazing indigenous snack!



1 year ago with 7 notes

Happy Native American Heritage Month - Day 22! Thanksgiving!

I’m still in the baking mode and I still have tons of acorn meal to use, so I made acorn cake today!

It’s a recipe that’s been in the family for generations, and is suspected to have come about during the Mission period when my father’s side of the family was living at the Mission. During the Mission period many Northern Mexico, Baja, and Southern California Natives were relocated into San Diego to help build the first California Mission. 

For a little over a hundred years there has been acorn recipes passed down to each female child. During most of the time they were never written down, but orally passed. During the early 1900’s my great grandma wrote down all the recipes in Kumeyaay.

It was passed to her oldest child, my grandma, and then passed to me. So from my family to yours:

Acorn Cake

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350° F (176° C).
  2. Mix dry ingredients (except sugar) together in a large bowl, making sure to sift the acorn and white flour together.
  3. In a separate bowl beat the eggs, oil, honey and sugar together. 
  4. Fold the dry ingredients into the wet, mixed until all combined but do not over mix.
  5. Pour into a cake pan, or cupcake tins leaving room to rise. Bake 30 minutes, or until knife is clean. Keep an eye during the last 15 minutes, acorn meal burns easily. 

These can be eaten plain or with frosting on top. 

Hopefully I translated the recipe correctly, my recipe does not use measured ingredients and is not written in English, so I made quick adjustments off the top of my head. 

Enjoy!

in’ya’ay maht u’yuh’ma!



1 year ago with 11 notes

Another reason why I hate today is that tons of people are romanticizing our culture and taking pity on us.

Stop it. We aren’t a bunch of noble, stoic chiefs who sit around and ponder about the Earth and how you can’t put a price on land. We aren’t philosophical people who give beautiful, heart-wrenching speeches about how to behave.

We may have held different views about our world than others, but you can’t romanticize us.

We are people. Just like you.

We have a culture. Just like you.

We have a history, and no matter how bad it was we are still like you.

Keep your pity, give me your respect.

Put down the warbonnet, stop being ignorant, and educate yourself.

You aren’t helping anyone by putting us on a pedestal as spiritual, Earth-loving people. 

You help us, specifically, by supporting our artists, learning our history, and helping us fight our social and governmental problems. 

Have a safe day, everyone.